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It’s not the end of the world: Recovering deleted items in Outlook

It’s probably happened to everyone: you meant to hit “reply” and accidentally hit “delete” instead.

The good news is that deleting items by mistake does not necessarily mean that an item is gone forever.

Is it really deleted? Not really.

When you delete items (emails, contacts, meeting invitations, etc.) from your mailbox, they are first transferred to the Deleted Items folder. So you can easily go in there and restore them to your inbox. Then, if it’s a calendar invitation, you can just re-accept it to add it back to your calendar.

If you deleted a calendar entry or a task, the system will ask you if you want to permanently delete it. So you have a chance to stop yourself.

But what about permanently deleted items?

If you have “permanently” deleted an item or emptied your Deleted Items folder, you can still recover those items. It depends on your Exchange server configuration — for example, permanently deleted items will be held on for 14 days on Intermedia’s Exchange 2007/2010 and 2013 servers.

During this time (called a retention period), you can restore deleted items in Outlook or OWA using the Recover Deleted Items process. (See below.)

One thing to note, though: if you hard-deleted a folder by pressing Shift-Delete, you will only see items from that folder in the Recover Deleted Items screen; you won’t find the whole folder there.

Use our handy guide when you need to recover a deleted item.

There are a few steps to the Recover Deleted Items process. We’ve created a comprehensive, fully illustrated guide to recovering items that shows you how the process works in a various versions of Outlook and OWA.

Or, if you’re an Intermedia customer, just give our support team a call at 800.379.7729 and they’ll help walk you through it.

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About Phillip Lewis

Phillip Lewis works on the Onboarding team. He spends his time transporting client data to Intermedia’s systems. His background is in British digital technology and its culture. In his spare time he likes to paint model airplanes.